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2 edition of Regime theory and a geometric model for stable alluvial channels found in the catalog.

Regime theory and a geometric model for stable alluvial channels

Shuyou Cao

Regime theory and a geometric model for stable alluvial channels

by Shuyou Cao

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Published by University of Birmingham in Birmingham .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D) - University of Birmingham, School of Civil Engineering.

Statementby Shuyou Cao.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21764516M

Ana Maria Ferreira da Silva, On the stable geometry of self-formed alluvial channels: theory and practical applicationThis article is one of a selection of papers in this Special Issue in honour of Professor M. Selim Yalin (–)., Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering, /L, 36, . Alluvial Channel Geometry: Theory and Applications Journal of Hydraulic Engineering April Discussion of “Critique of the Regime Theory for Alluvial Channels” by M. A. Stevens and C. F. Nordin, Jr. (November , Vol. , No. 11).

Parallel to this grain-size-dependent channel geometry is the concept of optimization, which assumes that rivers seek a threshold channel condition by maximizing the flow resis-tance within the channel to minimize the fluid shear stress (Eaton et al.,;Eaton and Church,). The rational regime theory put forward by Eaton attempts to. The self-adjustment of an alluvial channel is a complicated process with various factors influencing the stability and transformation of channel patterns. A cusp catastrophe model for the alluvial channel regime is established by selecting suitable parameters to quantify the channel pattern and stability. The channel patterns can be identified by such a model in a direct way with a quantified.

The model is formulated analytically with the aid of a series of approximate but reasonable assumptions. Singular perturbation techniques are used to define the channel geometry and obtain rational regime relations for straight channels. A comparison with data lends credence to the model.   Two approaches have been used for the design of stable alluvial channels: (1) Regime theory (2) tractive force method The tractive force approach is more rational, since it utilizes the laws governing sediment transport and resistance to flow. The regime theory is purely empirical in nature. 1.


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Regime theory and a geometric model for stable alluvial channels by Shuyou Cao Download PDF EPUB FB2

Chapter 9 Alluvial Channel Design Purpose Alluvial channel design techniques are generally used for movable boundary systems and streams with beds and banks made of unconsolidated sediment particles. In an alluvial channel, there is a continual exchange of the channel.

On the basis of previous work by the late Professor M. Selim Yalin and the author, the process of self-formation of alluvial streams and the final (equilibrium or regime) geometry of the self-formed stream are considered in the light of thermodynamic principles, including the first and second laws, and the Gibb’s equation; the stream is treated as an isolated and irreversible by: 6.

The capability of ANN models to predict the stable alluvial channels dimensions is investigated, where the flow rate and sediment mean grain size were considered as input variables and wetted.

Regime theory and geometric model for stable alluvial channels. By S. Cao. Abstract. Available from British Library Document Supply Centre-DSC:DXN / BLDSC - British Library Document Supply CentreSIGLEGBUnited KingdoAuthor: S. Cao. An alluvial channel is in stable, regime or dynamic equilibrium state when the rate of sediment transport is approximately equivalent to the existing sediment load and thus the average dimensions of the channel are preserved constant over time (Julien, ).Accurate design of cross-section dimensions of stable alluvial channels has a significant role in different branches of Cited by: The constructed ANN models can almost perfectly simulate the width, depth and slope of alluvial regime channels, which clearly describes the dominant geometrical parameters of alluvial rivers.

The results demonstrate that the ANN can precisely simulate the regime channel geometry, while the empirical, regression or rational equations can’t do. The Modified Regime Approach General The regime theory approach to evaluating channel stability is based on observations of the results in various parts of the world of natural processes causing continuous adjustments of channels.

The predictive equations are largely empirical. This method of analysis is limited to flow in alluvial channels. Deformable alluvial channels are known to adjust their geometry and slope to achieve stable conditions for a specified influx of water and sediment.

Designing the stable alluvial channel has been a captivating topic for scientists and engineers around the globe for years.

The work which was commenced by Kennedy in has been continued and various approaches have been given so far. Therefore, the new EANN model is proposed as a superior alternative to existing models for river engineering applications in the design of stable natural alluvial channels.

View Show abstract. stable channel evaluation and design in alluvial rivers and is one of the analytical methods selected for the SAM (Stable Channel Analytical Model) program de-veloped by the US Army Corps of Engineers [5,6].

For an empirical approach, various equilibrium theory methods based on the downstream hydraulic geometry have been introduced. Channel responses were predicted using an analytical stable channel model, the SAM (Stable Channel Analytical Model) program, based on a stability theory as well as empirical equations for equilibrium channel.

The results of the geomorphological channel changes showed that channels became narrower and bed levels became lower, whereas vegetated. The rational regime formulation, which was used by White, Bettess and Paris to predict the stable geometry of wide, trapezoidal alluvial channels and in producing the Wallingford Tables for the Design of Stable Alluvial Channels (Hydraulics Research, Wallingford, ), is reviewed.

This approach (the Wallingford rational regime theory) is known to provide useful results for moderate. As channel evaluation for abandoned channel restoration design, this study sought to exam channel changes from the past to the present and predict subsequently occurring river responses.

For the methodology, channel geomorphology changes were evaluated through image analyses of annual aerial photographs to complement the limited river data. Applicability of the flume relationship to alluvial channels General description Stable canals Natural rivers The hydraulic geometry of alluvial channels Discussion Regime relations Roughness o naturaf l alluvial channels Role of sediment composition Summary ANALYSIS: PART THREE.

Regime theory and geometric model for stable alluvial channels. Author: Cao, Shuyou. ISNI: Awarding Body: University of Birmingham Current Institution: University of Birmingham Date of Award: Availability of Full Text.

[1] The classical equations of hydraulic geometry are purely empirical, but the widespread similarity of the scaling (downstream) form of them suggests that they express some important underlying regularities in the morphology of stream channels through the drainage network.

A successful physical theory of river regime must be able to reproduce and explain this regularity. geometry relations in the regime theory by V. P Singh () [19] • Review and assessments of the theories of stable alluvial channel by V Desh Pande [20] () • A theoretical model is developed from predicting equilibrium alluvial channel form by Brelt C.

Eaton. The performance of regime models was tested against published data from river reaches and new hydraulic geometry data from gravel‐bed rivers in Patagonia (Argentina) and north‐eastern Italy.

Models that assume slope as a control (Ikeda et al., ; or Millar, ) predict channel. The discusser and the readers of the Journal may consult some excellent books regarding regime theory and stable channel design, including Graf, Bogardi, White, and Chang.

In general, τ * is not among the dependent variables describing an alluvial channel geometry (see the above references).

hydraulic geometry involving the channel process and form embodies two types of analyses both of This concept is similar to that embodied in the regime theory (Blench,). It The implication is that an alluvial channel adjusts its width, depth, slope, velocity, and friction to achieve a stable condition in which it is.

Alluvial channel geometry has been studied quantitatively for over one hundred years and it is now recognised to be a multi-variable problem. However, as yet there is no widespread agreement on what variables are the most important, nor is there agreement on the relationships between variables or on the form of general model.

This study tests the applicability to both stable canals and natural.This study tests the applicability to both stable canals and natural alluvial channels of an experimental flume relationship between channel shape and boundary shear distribution.

It establishes a multivariate model of downstream hydraulic geometry, showing clearly that channel geometry is generally controlled by four factors: flow discharge.the fluid on the banks to the geometry of the cross section and the weight of the individual particles.

c) Regime Theory In the regime theory approach, relationships for the channel width, depth and slope were established based on measurements from stable alluvial canals and rivers in India and Pakistan. MATHEMATICAL MODEL.